Keynote
Speakers

 

University College of London

Camillo Boano is Professor of Urban Design and Critical Theory at The Bartlett Development Planning Unit (DPU). He is is Co-Director of the UCL Urban Laboratory co-Director of the Building and Urban Design in Development MSc at the DPU. Camillo’s research has centred on the complex encounters between critical theory, radical philosophy and urban design processes, specifically engaging with informal urbanisations, urban collective actions, as well as crisis-generated urbanisms. He is working on a series of interconnected research projects in Latin America, South East Asia and the Middle East on urban infrastructures, habitability and city-wide upgrade.

 

Prior to joining UCL, Camillo worked in development and architectural practice for a number of years, became a research fellow at the Refugee Studies Centre in Oxford, joined the World Habitat Research Unit in Switzerland, and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology where he worked on a number of research and consultancy projects concerned with environmental forced migration, humanitarian urbanism, temporary shelters and post-disaster housing reconstruction. He is author The Ethics of a Potential Urbanism: Critical Encounters Between Giorgio Agamben and Architecture (2017), and two edited books Urban Geopolitics. Rethinking Planning in Contested Cities (2018) with Jonathan Rokem and Neoliberalism and Urban Development in Latin America: The Case of Santiago (2018) with Francisco Vergara-Perucich.

 

Professor 
DILANTHI AMARATUNGA

Professor
CAMILLO BOANO

Dilanthi Amaratunga is a Professor of Disaster Risk Management at the University of Huddersfield, UK with 27 years of experience in the higher education sector. She currently leads the Global Disaster Resilience Centre, a global leader in interdisciplinary research, education and advocacy to improve the resilience of nations and communities at the University of Huddersfield.

Dilanthi obtained her BSc (Quantity Surveying) Degree with First Class Honours from the University of Moratuwa Sri Lanka in 1993. In October 1997, she was awarded the prestigious Overseas Research Scholarship Award, which enabled her to begin her doctoral studies at the University of Salford, UK. 

Prior to joining the University of Huddersfield in 2014, she was at the University of Salford since 1997, starting out as a PhD research scholar. Within a span of 5 years, she progressed from being a lecturer to a full Professor at the University of Salford in 2006. She has secured a number of significant, high profile grants including EC funded ASCENT (Advancing Skill Creation to ENhance Transformation) with 16 international partners, CADRE and CASCADE. ASCENT aims to address R&I capacity strengthening for the development of societal resilience to disasters. In January 2014, she was invited by the European Commission to formally launch their Horizon 2020: the new EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation in South Asia.

University of Huddersfield

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Christian Werthmann is Professor of Landscape Architecture and Design at the Leibniz University Hannover.  His research concentrates on the potentials of landscape architecture and infrastructure in heavily urbanized and socially conflicted terrain.

His research activities make him part of a small but growing group of landscape architects engaged in non-formal cities and disaster zones, where he overlays technical innovation with social and natural systems to foster productive and engaging public spaces. Until 2012, Werthmann was an Associate Professor and Director of the Master in Landscape Architecture Degree Programs at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.

Since 2007, Professor Werthmann has focused on the phenomena of informal urbanism as the dominant force for urban growth on the planet. Based on his innovative, risk-related research investigations, Professor Werthmann has been awarded the prestigious Hans Fischer Senior Fellowship of the Technical University in Munich (2011).

 

Most recently, he published with Jessica Bridger the book „Metropolis Nonformal“. His latest research focusses on anticipatory strategies for imminent informal urbanization in the landslide-prone hills of Medellin, Colombia. 

University of Hannover

Professor
CHRISTIAN WERTHMANN

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Isabel Raposo is an architect-urbanist, associate professor at the Faculty of Architecture, University of Lisbon (FAUL) teaching since 2002. Architect by ESBAL (Lisbon, 1976), in 1986, she completed a Master and in 1999 a PhD in Urbanism and Planning at the University of Paris XII. In 2017, she was awarded the title of Honorary Member of the Order of Architects. 

 

Since the 80’s she coordinated several research projects on Lusophone Africa and Portugal funded by the Foundation for Science and Technology and municipalities. Since 2007 she has been coordinator of GESTUAL, a Socio-Territorial and Urban Studies and Local Action Study Group, at CIAUD / FAUL and has supervised Master and PhD students on urban and housing transformation, especially in suburban areas in Portugal, Mozambique, Angola and Brazil.

In this context she has coordinated local action and university extension work in peri-urban and self-produced neighbourhoods in Lisbon Metropolitan Area.

She has published dozens of book chapter and books as well as papers in scientific periodicals on the Right to the City, on the transformation of popular housing in rural and (sub)urban areas, on urban poverty reduction, on the rehabilitation of ancient urban centres and on peri-urban urbanization

University of Lisbon

Professor

ISABEL RAPOSO

Professor Renn is a Scientific Director at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam (Germany). He remains affiliated to his former institute, the Stuttgart Research Center for Interdisciplinary Risk and Innovation Studies at the University of Stuttgart (ZIRIUS), and continues to direct, together with Dr Marion Dreyer and Agnes Lampke, the non-profit company DIALOGIK, a research institute for the investigation of communication and participation processes.

 

He is Adjunct Professor for Integrated Risk Analysis at Stavanger University (Norway) and Affiliate Professor for Risk Governance at Beijing Normal University. Professor Renn has a PhD in social psychology from the University of Cologne. His career has included teaching and research positions at the Jülich Research Centre (Germany), Clark University (Worcester, USA), the Swiss Institute of Technology (Zurich) and the Center of Technology Assessment (Stuttgart).

 

He is a member of several boards, including the National Academy of Disaster Reduction and Emergency Management of the People’s Republic of China and the Governing Board of the German Academy of Science and Engineering (acatech). In the past he served on the panel on “Public Participation in Environmental Assessment and Decision Making” of the US National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. (from 2005 to 2007) and on the German Federal Government’s Commission on Energy Ethics after Fukushima (2011). He was elected president of the International Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) for the period from 2012 to 2013.

Sustainable Institute Potsdam

Professor

ORTWIN RENN

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Professor David Sanderson has over 25 years experience working across the world in development and emergencies. He worked for eight years for the NGO CARE International UK, as head of policy and subsequently regional manager for southern and west Africa. From 2006-2013 David was Director of CENDEP, a centre at Oxford Brookes University focusing on development and emergencies. Between 2013-14 he was a Visiting Professor at Harvard University. 

David has published a number of articles and papers concerning urban livelihoods, shelter and disaster risk reduction. He has carried out a number of assignments for NGOs and donors across the world, and in recent years has led post-disaster reviews in Haiti, Pakistan, Bangladesh, India, the Philippines and Nepal. He was trained in architecture, holds a PhD in urban livelihoods and vulnerability and a Masters degree in Development Practice.

David was appointed the Inaugural Judith Neilson Chair at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney, Australia, in February 2016. He is a member of several NGO boards and committees, including the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) and the Humanitarian Innovation Fund (HIF). He is currently a steering group member for the Global Alliance for Urban Crises and is an editor of PLoS: Disasters Journal. David is editor of the 2016 IFRC World Disasters Report.

University of New South Wales

Professor

DAVID SANDERSON

Hsieh Ying-chun is a Taiwanese architect and contractor. 

In his socially engaged work Hsieh has been helping people rebuild their homes since the devastating earthquake in Taiwan 1999, when his reconstruction project for the Thao Tribe gained him international recognition.

Hsieh organized the reconstruction of housing and communities in disaster-struck areas while faced with two challenges: to build houses within an extremely tight budget (25%-50% of the market price) and to base the projects on the notion of sustainable construction, green building, cultural preservation and creation of local employment opportunities. Hsieh has played a key role in rebuilding communities for Taiwan’s tribal communities.

In more recent years, Hsieh has continued to help people build their own houses, from the remote villages of China to the sufferers of the South East Asian Tsunami.

When we face the future challenge of environmental crisis, a one-dimensional technical thought process is inadequate; the considerations must be broadened to cultural, economical, and environmental levels. 

Hsieh represented Taiwan in the Venice Architecture Biennale 2006 and Venice Biennale of Contemporary Art 2009. Hsieh is part of the architectural team WEAK! together with Roan Ching-yueh and Marco Casagrande. The WEAK! operates an independent architectural research centre Ruin Academy as their headquarters in Taipei.

The Curry Stone Design Prize 2011 was awarded to Hsieh Ying-Chun to champion the designer as a force of social change building more than 3.000 homes with local people in natural disaster zones in Taiwan and Mainland China.

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University of Minho

Professor

PAULO B. LOURENÇO

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Professor 
DILANTHI AMARATUNGA

University of Huddersfield

Dilanthi Amaratunga is a Professor of Disaster Risk Management at the University of Huddersfield, UK with 27 years of experience in the higher education sector. She currently leads the Global Disaster Resilience Centre, a global leader in interdisciplinary research, education and advocacy to improve the resilience of nations and communities at the University of Huddersfield.

Dilanthi obtained her BSc (Quantity Surveying) Degree with First Class Honours from the University of Moratuwa Sri Lanka in 1993. In October 1997, she was awarded the prestigious Overseas Research Scholarship Award, which enabled her to begin her doctoral studies at the University of Salford, UK. 

Prior to joining the University of Huddersfield in 2014, she was at the University of Salford since 1997, starting out as a PhD research scholar. Within a span of 5 years, she progressed from being a lecturer to a full Professor at the University of Salford in 2006. She has secured a number of significant, high profile grants including EC funded ASCENT (Advancing Skill Creation to ENhance Transformation) with 16 international partners, CADRE and CASCADE. ASCENT aims to address R&I capacity strengthening for the development of societal resilience to disasters. In January 2014, she was invited by the European Commission to formally launch their Horizon 2020: the new EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation in South Asia.

Professor
CAMILLO BOANO

University College of London

Camillo Boano is Professor of Urban Design and Critical Theory at The Bartlett Development Planning Unit (DPU). He is is Co-Director of the UCL Urban Laboratory co-Director of the Building and Urban Design in Development MSc at the DPU. Camillo’s research has centred on the complex encounters between critical theory, radical philosophy and urban design processes, specifically engaging with informal urbanisations, urban collective actions, as well as crisis-generated urbanisms. He is working on a series of interconnected research projects in Latin America, South East Asia and the Middle East on urban infrastructures, habitability and city-wide upgrade.

 

Prior to joining UCL, Camillo worked in development and architectural practice for a number of years, became a research fellow at the Refugee Studies Centre in Oxford, joined the World Habitat Research Unit in Switzerland, and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology where he worked on a number of research and consultancy projects concerned with environmental forced migration, humanitarian urbanism, temporary shelters and post-disaster housing reconstruction. He is author The Ethics of a Potential Urbanism: Critical Encounters Between Giorgio Agamben and Architecture (2017), and two edited books Urban Geopolitics. Rethinking Planning in Contested Cities (2018) with Jonathan Rokem and Neoliberalism and Urban Development in Latin America: The Case of Santiago (2018) with Francisco Vergara-Perucich.

 

Professor
CHRISTIAN WERTHMANN

University of Hannover

Christian Werthmann is Professor of Landscape Architecture and Design at the Leibniz University Hannover.  His research concentrates on the potentials of landscape architecture and infrastructure in heavily urbanized and socially conflicted terrain.

His research activities make him part of a small but growing group of landscape architects engaged in non-formal cities and disaster zones, where he overlays technical innovation with social and natural systems to foster productive and engaging public spaces. Until 2012, Werthmann was an Associate Professor and Director of the Master in Landscape Architecture Degree Programs at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.

Since 2007, Professor Werthmann has focused on the phenomena of informal urbanism as the dominant force for urban growth on the planet. Based on his innovative, risk-related research investigations, Professor Werthmann has been awarded the prestigious Hans Fischer Senior Fellowship of the Technical University in Munich (2011).

 

Most recently, he published with Jessica Bridger the book „Metropolis Nonformal“. His latest research focusses on anticipatory strategies for imminent informal urbanization in the landslide-prone hills of Medellin, Colombia. 

Professor

ISABEL RAPOSO

University of Lisbon

Isabel Raposo is an architect-urbanist, associate professor at the Faculty of Architecture, University of Lisbon (FAUL) teaching since 2002. Architect by ESBAL (Lisbon, 1976), in 1986, she completed a Master and in 1999 a PhD in Urbanism and Planning at the University of Paris XII. In 2017, she was awarded the title of Honorary Member of the Order of Architects. 

 

Since the 80’s she coordinated several research projects on Lusophone Africa and Portugal funded by the Foundation for Science and Technology and municipalities. Since 2007 she has been coordinator of GESTUAL, a Socio-Territorial and Urban Studies and Local Action Study Group, at CIAUD / FAUL and has supervised Master and PhD students on urban and housing transformation, especially in suburban areas in Portugal, Mozambique, Angola and Brazil.

In this context she has coordinated local action and university extension work in peri-urban and self-produced neighbourhoods in Lisbon Metropolitan Area.

She has published dozens of book chapter and books as well as papers in scientific periodicals on the Right to the City, on the transformation of popular housing in rural and (sub)urban areas, on urban poverty reduction, on the rehabilitation of ancient urban centres and on peri-urban urbanization

Professor

ORTWIN RENN

Sustainable Institute Potsdam

Professor Renn is a Scientific Director at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam (Germany). He remains affiliated to his former institute, the Stuttgart Research Center for Interdisciplinary Risk and Innovation Studies at the University of Stuttgart (ZIRIUS), and continues to direct, together with Dr Marion Dreyer and Agnes Lampke, the non-profit company DIALOGIK, a research institute for the investigation of communication and participation processes.

 

He is Adjunct Professor for Integrated Risk Analysis at Stavanger University (Norway) and Affiliate Professor for Risk Governance at Beijing Normal University. Professor Renn has a PhD in social psychology from the University of Cologne. His career has included teaching and research positions at the Jülich Research Centre (Germany), Clark University (Worcester, USA), the Swiss Institute of Technology (Zurich) and the Center of Technology Assessment (Stuttgart).

 

He is a member of several boards, including the National Academy of Disaster Reduction and Emergency Management of the People’s Republic of China and the Governing Board of the German Academy of Science and Engineering (acatech). In the past he served on the panel on “Public Participation in Environmental Assessment and Decision Making” of the US National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. (from 2005 to 2007) and on the German Federal Government’s Commission on Energy Ethics after Fukushima (2011). He was elected president of the International Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) for the period from 2012 to 2013.

Architect

HSIEH YING-CHUN 

Atelier 3

"In the past 18 years, architect HSIEH Ying-Chun and his team - Atelier-3 - have conducted more than 3000 houses in the post-disaster areas in East Asia.

Facing varied critical site contexts and socio-political conditions, HSIEH and his team applied the reinforced lightweight gauge steel frame for housing reconstruction with three fundamental principles: 1) single-line drawings for participatory design, 2) simplified joints for collaborative construction, and 3) open system for adopting and submitting to climatic and geographic condition. Based on the above three principles, this paper thematically reviews the architectural practices of HSIEH and his team with selected key projects. These examined projects closely present how they initiated, articulated, communicated and implemented their principles in different sites.

 

The analyses conclude that ‘self-reliance’ can be seen as their fundamental philosophy encapsulated in their notions of sustainable construction, green building, cultural preservation and creation of local employment opportunities. Following their philosophical ideologies, HSIEH and his team have treated the survivors as the ‘producers’ of their own houses, instead of the ‘consumers’. Meanwhile, by designing and building the houses together, the survivors had a chance to re-build their communities, regain their socioeconomic status, and re-establish the intimacy between architectural production and everyone’s everyday life. As a critique of dominant trends of consumerism, elite professionalism and aestheticism seen in today’s architectural practices in general and post-disaster humanitarian projects particularly, HSIEH and his team’s work provides an insight into the society of East Asia and illuminates its challenges and opportunities."
(in 'Humanitarian Architecture by Esther Charlesworth)

Special Session on Architecture Heritage

Professor

PAULO B. LOURENÇO

University of Minho

Professor Paulo B. Lourenço, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minho, Guimarães, Portugal and Co-Head of the Institute in Sustainability and Innovation in Structural Engineering.

He is experienced in the fields of NDT, advanced experimental and numerical techniques, innovative strengthening techniques and earthquake engineering. Specialist in structural restoration, with work on more than one hundred monuments. He is also a structural masonry expert, responsible for R&D projects with the clay brick, concrete block and lightweight concrete block masonry. Consultant on innovative masonry structures using confined and reinforced masonry, and on masonry infills in large projects. He currently is the leader of the Project Team responsible for the revision of Part 1 of the European code for masonry (EN 1996-1-1).

Coordinator of an International Masters Course in Structural Analysis of Monuments and Historical Constructions. Editor of the International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis and Restoration and of the Conference Series, Structural Analysis of Historical Constructions.

Supervisor of 50 completed PhD theses and coordinator of several national and international research projects. He is author or co-author of more than 1000 technical and scientific publications in the fields of masonry, timber and concrete structures, with an h-index of 42 (Scopus)

Seminar in Gender´s Resilience

Professor

MAUREEN FORDHAM

University College of London

Maureen Fordham BSc PhD is Professor of Gender and Disaster Resilience. Maureen Fordham, BSc and PhD, is a Professor of Gender and Disaster Resilience, She leads the Centre for Gender and Disasters at The IRDR, the Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction, at the UCL. She has been researching disasters since 1988. She has a particular interest in marginalized and, so-called, vulnerable groups in disaster including women and children in particular.

She was a founding member of the Gender and Disaster Network in 1997 and is the coordinator of its website (www.gdnonline.org) and activities.

 

She is a frequent participant in gender and disaster policy level meetings within the UN system as well as nationally and internationally. She has edited, and is on the editorial boards of, international disaster-related journals.

Special Session on Risk to Wildfires

Professor

FANTINA TEDIM

University of Porto

Fantina Tedim has an Undergraduate Degree in Geography by University of Porto, a Master in Human Geography by the University of Coimbra and a PhD in Human Geography by University of Porto. She is currently Assistant Professor at Geography Department, Faculty of Arts, University of Porto.

In 2002 she created a Master course in Analysis and Management of Natural Risks, the first one to be created in Portugal.  In 2005 she began her research in natural hazards and published her first work related with tsunami risk. Her current research focuses on vulnerability and resilience in a multi-hazard approach (e.g. forest fires, floods, coastal erosion, and tsunamis) and risk communication.

Special Session on Risk to Wildfires

Professor

ALAN MARCH

University of Melbourne

Dr Alan March is Director of the Bachelor of Design at the University of Melbourne, and Associate Professor of Urban Planning.  Alan has practised and researched in urban planning since 1991 and specialises in urban planning, disaster risk reduction, and bushfire.

He is lead researcher for the project "Integrating Urban Planning with Natural Hazard Mitigation" federally funded by the Bushfire and Natural Hazard Cooperative Research Council.  His other projects currently include examination of improved housing design for bushfire, assessment of student vulnerability in disasters, and the education of built environment professionals to achieve resilience in human settlements.

Special Session on Humanitarian Architecture and Incremental Housing

Professor

CARMEN MENDOZA ARROYO

School of Architecture of the Universitat Internacional de Catalunya

Architect and PhD of Urban Design and Planning. She is Associate Professor and assistant director to the School of Architecture of the Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC Barcelona). She is director of the Master in International Cooperation: Sustainable Emergency Architecture. Her work is based on two main lines of research. The first on the comprehensive regeneration of degraded and informal settlements, which is developed through a methodology which delves into the recognition and mapping of voids and places of urban significance through community participation.

 

In this line she has developed plans and urban projects in the metropolitan region of Barcelona and informal settlements in Latin America.  Her second line and most recent research encompasses urban reconstruction and resilience in the field of emergency architecture as well as urban integration strategies for displaced population and refugees. In this line she developing and guiding research.

 

 In both lines she has published articles and books. Her research reflects on how the separate study of the social and physical environment has caused a schism in our understanding of space, place and social order. As of 2006 she is co-principal with David Lladó of the firm DACarquitectura, rehabilitación y urbanismo S. L. P. Barcelona in charge of Urban design and planning projects.

Special Session on Humanitarian Architecture and Incremental Housing

Professor

CHIU CHEN-YU 

Bilkent University

Chiu Chen-Yu graduated from Chung Yuan Christian University, Taiwan in 2002 with a Bachelor of Architecture. He achieved a Masters degree in Urban Design at Columbia University in New York in 2005 and received his PhD at the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning,

 

The University of Melbourne, in 2011. From 2013–15, he worked as a Post-Doctoral researcher at Department of Architecture, Aalto University, Finland. Since September 2016, he has worked as an Assistant Professor at Department of Architecture, Bilkent University. His primary research interest is in the cross-cultural/national relationships and humanitarian approach within the field of architecture.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Contacts

If you require technical advice about abstract or paper submission, or further details about the conference venue, travel and accommodation, please contact the conference organiser at 

icbr2018@buildresilience.org

 

@2018 by 8th ICBR Lisbon, Portugal.